How to Buy Wine for a Gift

Wine Gifts

by Kim Vermaak

If you have decided to go for a wine as a corporate gift this year, there are some point to consider on how 

 

to buy wine for a gift.

 

Step 1: Get real on the budget

 

If you have decided to chose wine as a corporate gift, realise that cheap and nasty, will give you a nasty reception. Go mid-range to high end. If you do not know much about wine, you can be tempted to go for the cheapest wine.

 

However, cheap wine will taste cheap. Unless you have personally tasted the wine and know that it is an excellent value for money deal, you just don’t want to pick the cheapest wine

.Also, consider who you’re buying the wine for. Buying a very cheap bottle of wine for your boss won’t endear you to them. Similarly, you may not want to buy the cheapest bottle you can find for a close friend.

 

If you’re known as someone who appreciates wine, buying a cheap bottle for someone else can come off as you underestimating their taste or simply not appreciating them as much.

 

Step 2: Consider the season. 

 

If you don’t know where to start, picking wines by the season is a good bet. You don’t necessarily want the same wines in the summer that you do in the winter. In the summer, you want something lighter, for instance, than you do in winter.

 

White wines like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, and Riesling are good summer choices. Rose and Merlot are also a good bet. These wines are bit lighter.

 

For fall, you want fuller bodied whites, such as oaked Chardonnay or Viognier. You still want a somewhat lighter red wine, so stick with Pinot noir, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, or a sparkling variety.

 

During the winter, you can go with heavier wines since you’ll have heavier dishes. Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux blend, Syrah, Zinfandel, and Malbec are fine in the reds.

 

For whites, choose oaked Chardonnay. You can also go for a sparkling wine. In the spring, you want lighter, fruitier wines, such as Chenin Blanc, Pinot Grigio, Unoaked Chardonnay, or Rose. You can also choose Riesling, Moscato, or Pinot noir.

 

Step 3: Ask questions. 

 

If you’re not a wine connoisseur yourself, gazing at a liquor store’s collection of wines can a challenge. 

 

There are just so many to choose from. If you are feeling overwhelmed, don’t be afraid to ask the person in charge of wines for advice.

 

Step 4: Make sure it’s appropriate. 

 

That is, you don’t want to buy wine the majority of your clients have a no alcohol policy. For instance, maybe your client enjoys alcohol, but they don’t like wine. Another situation you may run into is that your client does not may not drink at all, due to personal choice, health reasons, or religious reasons. If you’re not sure, ask.

 

Step 5: Choose good labeling 

 

When you’re giving a wine, the packaging matters. A  well-designed label will be more appreciated than a subdued, boring label, especially since many people will associate the latter with cheaper wine. So investin a good looking label.  There are many free lance graphic designers who will be able to design a very eye catching label for you.

 

Step 6: Choose your packaging

 

Are you going to wrap the wine, or use a gift bag? Research shows that wrapped gifts produce a better response from the recipient. So spend a little extra to make sure that the gift is well presented.  Remember the gift may be waiting at reception for the recipient if you deliver while they are not there.  In this time, you label on the bag may form as an advertisement for your company or brand.

 

During the winter, you can go with heavier wines since you’ll have heavier dishes. Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux blend, Syrah, Zinfandel, and Malbec are fine in the reds.

 

For whites, choose oaked Chardonnay. You can also go for a sparkly wine. In the spring, you want lighter, fruitier wines, such as Chenin Blanc, Pinot Grigio, Unoaked Chardonnay, or Rose. You can also choose Riesling, Moscato, or Pinot noir.

 

Step 3: Ask questions. 

 

If you’re not a wine connoisseur yourself, gazing at a liquor store’s collection of wines can a challenge.

There are justso many to choosefrom. If you are feeling overwelmed, don’t be afraid to ask the person in charge of wines for advice.

 

Step 4: Make sure it’s appropriate. 

 

That is, you don’t want to buy wine th majory of your clients have a no alchohol policy. For instance, maybe your client enjoys alcohol, but they don’t like wine. Another situation you may run into is that your client does not may not drink at all, due to personal choice, health reasons, or religious reasons. If you’re not sure, ask.

 

Step 5: Choose good labelling 

 

When you’re giving a wine, the packaging matters. A  well-designed label will be more appreciated than a subdued, boring label, especially since many people will associate the latter with cheaper wine. So invest in a good looking label.  There are many free lance graphic designers who will be able to design a very eye catching label for you.

 

Step 6: Choose your packaging

 

Are you going to wrap the wine, or use a gift bag? Research shows that wrapped gifts produce a better response from the recipient. So spend a little extra to mak sure that the gift is well presented.  Remeber the gift  may be waiting at reception for the recipient if you deliver while they are not there.  In this time, your label on the bag may form as an adverstisemnt for your company or brand.